Oswald and the Kennedy assassination

The 1960s were a clamorous and turbulent decade, marred by the assassinations of John F. Kennedy, his brother Robert, and Martin Luther King. Those who lived in that time felt that the world had spun out of control. It was but a small taste of what people had gone through in the 1930s, with Stalin and Hitler vying for attention and power, and war looming.

In all the enormous literature of the John Kennedy assassination, nothing has seemed stranger to me than the failure to point out the obvious. Lee Harvey Oswald was a deserter from the US Marines, he defected to the Soviet Union, he married a Soviet citizen, he renounced his American citizenship, then  demanded  it back from none other than John Connally,  Governor of Texas, whom Oswald later wounded in the attack of November 22nd,1963, and was admitted back into the United States and his citizenship restored.

Now the CIA has released formerly secret information

Three days after John F. Kennedy was shot and killed in Dallas, U.S. intelligence officials told President Lyndon B. Johnson that they had confirmed that assassin Lee Harvey Oswald had recently traveled to Mexico City to visit both the Cuban and Soviet embassies, according to a half-century old briefing memo declassified on Wednesday.

According to the Nov. 25, 1963 briefing, Oswald — a former U.S. Marine who defected to the Soviet Union in 1959 — visited both the Cuban and Soviet embassies on Sept. 28, 1963.

According to the Nov. 25, 1963 briefing, Oswald — a former U.S. Marine who defected to the Soviet Union in 1959 — visited both the Cuban and Soviet embassies on Sept. 28, 1963.

I am fascinated by the general line on Oswald that came out of the Warren Commission’s findings, that he was a lone gunman. While this is plausible, it is by no means the only conclusion consistent with the facts.

Amidst all the speculation that Oswald was a hitman for the Mob, angered by Attorney-General Robert Kennedy’s prosecution of them, and other more far- fetched ideas, the one theory that was never pursued in public was that it was a Soviet wet job. After all, in 1983 the KGB got the Bulgarians to hire a Turk to shoot a Pope, did they not?

It was not until the Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was killed in the streets of Stockholm in 1986 that Soviet assassination attempts against western leaders ceased. Palme was the moral equivalent of the Pope to the Soviets, in my belief. Read the Wikipedia entry on him (above) and you will see why.

But I am off topic. Regardless of the effects of the Palme assassination on Soviet adventurism, the fact remains that the obvious linkage between Lee Harvey Oswald and the Soviet Union was never publicly explored. Why? Was it just too frightening to contemplate that the KGB could kill a US President and get away with it?

Arran Gold

Oswald was too unstable to considered for a mission of this magnitude by anybody. On the day of the assassination, LBJ did think that it was carried out by the Soviets and that it was part of larger plot. He had police officer lie on top of him as he made his way to the airport. Soviets in turn grounded their Air Force on that day.

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